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Interview with Radio France

 

Rfi_logoRecently Zubin Atré had an interview with Sébastien Farcis from Radio France, where another practitioner Sara Zennaro also talked about the benefits of yoga in helping with her rheumatoid arthritis.

A brief summary in English: Farcis describes the yoga class taking place in Defence Colony. Speaking to one of the students, Farcis reveals how she found her arthritis gradually abated as she practised yoga.

Narendra Modi is convinced, meanwhile, of the benefits of yoga, and has successfully lobbied for an International Day for Yoga. For the millions of employees sat in front of computers, yoga is definitely a beneficial practice, but Zubin Atré says that rather than being a Hindu practice it is something far more universal, like gravity.

YOGA_EN_INDE (Yoga in India)

Here is the interview in French:

 

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Do’s of AtréYoga Studio

do

1. DO arrive 10 minutes early. New students can get to know the class and talk to the instructor. Arriving early also gives you time to lay out your mat, stretch and catch up with teachers and participants.

2. DO let your teacher know about any injuries or pains. Let the teacher know if any medical conditions may affect your practice. Talk to the teacher before and after the class and let them know if any pains arise.

3. DO remove your shoes as soon as you enter the room and leave them at the entrance in the appropriate space to ensure maximum hygiene and comfort to all the participants.

4. DO turn off mobile phones and other distractions. Enjoy the yoga class in full awareness while at the studio. Leave work, home and other thoughts behind.

5. DO maintain silence. Talking during the class distracts your yoga practice and others’.

6. DO bring your own mat. Feel free to use AtréYoga mats as a base layer. Top layer mats are also available, but you are advised to bring your mat for hygiene reasons.

7. DO expect adjustments. One of the precepts of AtréYoga is adjustments, and teachers are expected to guide you gently with appropriate touch.

8. DO what you easily can. There is no competition. You are expected to move at your own pace. Listen to your body and do not push yourself.

9. DO put mats away neatly. Roll up mats neatly after the class, and put them in the appropriate slots for top and base layer mats.

10. DO share your feedback. Do talk to the teacher after the class about your experience.

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Which power nap is for you?

power-naps-and-effects-infographicA power nap takes 10-20 minutes of sleep, when the brain releases theta waves, and falls into a relaxed state of mind. This state ends before the occurrence of deep sleep (or slow wave sleep).A power nap gives you an instant flow of energy as it increases alertness, stamina, motor learning and motor performance. It also improves muscle memory and it clears the brain from unnecessary built-up information, which helps long-term memory. Avoid nonetheless napping for longer than 30 minutes: after that time your sleep state will progress to the second stage of sleep in which one feels sleep inertia. It would take you more efforts to shake that off.

(Click infographic on left to see higher resolution).

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Pulling Strings

Orignally published in TIMEOUT DELHI by Arunima Mazumdar

Turn up, tune in, drop out with a session of sitar yoga It’s a quiet Sunday morning at Shahpur Jat. The shops are shut and the dogs are curled up beside the roadside tea-stalls. A handful of us have assembled at Atré Yoga Studio, watching the sun rays silently forcing its way through the partly-open balcony doors, creating abstract art on the colourful yoga mats laid out on the floor. A sitar leans on a wall in one corner of the room. “Yoga allows one to handle situations effortlessly, and music is the language of emotions,” said Zubin Atré, founder of AtréYoga, explaining the concept behind his “sitar yoga” sessions. “When yoga is practised with music, it nourishes the experience and takes it beyond just performing an asana.”

sitar

Started in 2009, AtréYoga is an initiative that celebrates the ancient art of yoga in new ways. Atré, who was introduced to yoga by his father at the age of three, has been trying to combine it with other distinct forms. It was at a yoga jam session at Atré Yoga Studio four years ago that Atré met sitar player Galen Passen. “We spoke about combining these two graceful practices together and the idea clicked,” Atré said. “We met again and practiced it together, and it took us less than ten minutes to realise that we were on the same frequency and what we were doing was making a lot of sense.”

Atré begins every sitar yoga session with the padmasana (lotus pose) and Passen settles beside him with his sitar. Atré, with his eyes closed, focuses on the lingering pulse of the sitar, which is gradually roused to life by Passen. Atré begins the warm-up stretches, before slowly moving on to the sitting asanas. Unlike other yoga classes, there are no vocal instructions. The idea is to enjoy the flow of yoga and sitar together. Thus, the mats are arranged in a way that every individual is able to see either Atré or the person in front of them. The sitar melody created by Passen miraculously appears to be in sync with the flow of body movements. The asanas rise and fall like a chain reaction in slow motion. Sometimes, the sitar catches up with the pace of the class and sometimes, it is the other way round.

The 90-minute sitar yoga session is more about wellness than fitness and Atré’s target audience is universal. “Anyone who aims to experience yoga beyond the basic asana is welcome,” he said. “We have people of all ages and from all backgrounds coming in. I would recommend the sessions for people with hectic lifestyles and urge them to take some time out to feel the wakefulness and awareness of the mind, and the relaxation of the body, at the same time.”

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Back pain, neck pain? Could these be trigger point issues? Let’s yoga it out!

Yoga expert Zubin Atré uses his knowledge of trigger points to alleviate pain caused by myofascial knots. As this video by Michiel Akkerman beautifully illustrates, many pains in the upper back and between the shoulder blades are a result of “trigger points”. Some of the chronic conditions caused by trigger points include frozen shoulder, muscle spasms, chronic neck stiffness and migraine. This video shows how people could treat trigger points themselves. The example given here is self-massage using a ball agains the wall. Yoga is another effective way of dealing with trigger points on your own. Certain yoga asanas performed with appropriate breathing techniques help stretch the muscles affecting trigger points. Practicing asanas regularly dissolves the knots. Please leave your comments and questions here. Or write to info@atreyogastudio.com.

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Suggested ways to approach someone with depression

A very simple video made by WHO (World Health Organization) guides us about the ‘Do’s and Don’ts’ with the help of ‘Black Dog’ illustrations.

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Yoga Quotes

yoga quote_work

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Biomechanics of the Sun Salutation

Yoga_Sun

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